New Economics Course Offerings - Spring 2019

New Economics Course Offerings - Spring 2019

ECON 453 (ECON 497 Special Topics) Monopolization and Vertical Restraints (3 CR)
Monopoly is not illegal in the United States but efforts by single dominant firms to attain a monopoly position in the marketplace are illegal. This course examines the kinds of behaviors in the marketplace that single dominant firms often engage in that lead to the accusation of monopolization conduct. Included among these are territorial and customer restraints, exclusive dealing, bundling, and tying. Other types of monopolization conduct include predation and entry deterrence. The pro-competitive and anti-competitive effects of these conducts are examined. The course also examines empirical methods used to evaluate vertical restraints and monopolization within an industry. Throughout the course, case studies are examined.

 

ECON 472N (Cross-listed with HIST 402N) Russian Economic History (3 CR)

Russia is the largest country on earth. It has had a major influence on world events, especially during the Soviet period. The Soviet period represents the greatest economic experiment ever undertaken. Russia has had a vast imperial experience, and its economy has proven capable of producing nuclear weapons and space exploration. Yet, its economy remains dependent on natural resources. Russia is a literary, nuclear and geopolitical superpower but not an economic superpower. This juxtaposition is unique. The aim of the course is to provide a review of Russian economic history together with main concepts explaining the peculiarities of economic and institutional development of the country. The course combines historical narrative with formal economic analyses. We will utilize both an economics and a history perspective. We will explore the development of the Russian economy in the Tsarist period, the abolition of serfdom and Russian industrialization before the Russian Revolution, and we will explore the economic history of the Soviet period. We will also explore the interaction of economic history with social history. The course will conclude by examining the myriad economic and social difficulties encountered in transitioning from a socialist to capitalist economy.